How To BackUp

Hello Everyone,

In this post, I will show you how to backup your files in Winworks AutoShop. We recommend you backup every day when you run your End of Day Process. And for ultimate data protection, we also recommend you cycle through 3 USB flash drives so you always have a copy of your data.

Step 1- Make sure you are on the Main server computer. And all other users are closed out of Winworks

Step 2- identify the location of your USB flash drive by going to “This PC’ folder on your computer, navigate to the folder you wish to backup to. And Copy the file path.

Step 4- Paste that file path in the Backup utility in Winworks in options and Backup Files. Should only take a few minutes for this process to complete.

If you have any questions. Call us or send us an email

Winworks Service Tracking

Service tracking in AutoShop can save you time and help you bring customers back into your shop. Getting customers to come back into your shop is a key part of growing your business. Winworks Service Tracking and automatically notify you when a customer is due for a service when they are in your shop. That way you can upsell them on a service, or check up. You can also run a marketing campaign in our Marketing Machine. Send a text, email, postcard or just print mailing labels. Want to know more, read below, and watch the video at the bottom of the page.

1. Set up the Service Tracking Groups.-

Go to Lists>Service Tracking. Here you can set up different service groups. Set up your timeframe, and mileage you would like to track for that service group. So when every task with that service group is selected, it will be tracked by Winworks.  Make sure to have the correct maintenance schedule selected. This will ensure that when you run marketing campaigns they will go to the correct people and the correct vehicles. 

2. Set up the Tasks

When you are in the task window. Look on the right-hand side of the screen, and look for “Service Tracking” and when you have that selected to the correct Service Type, you will be able to automatically track the Service Selected.

Don’t Overlook Automotive Technology as a High-Tech Career Path

Written by Tony Molla

Parents, if becoming an automotive technician is not high on your list of career choices for your child, perhaps it’s time to look again.

Automotive service and repair has changed dramatically in just the span of a generation. Working in the automotive service and repair industry is now one of the high-tech careers that is always in demand and can’t be outsourced overseas.

Sophisticated computerized control systems, unheard of 30 years ago, are now standard equipment on much of the nation’s fleet of vehicles. Modern advanced driver assist systems (ADAS), such as stability and traction control, adaptive cruise control, automatic braking and variable valve timing, just to name a few, are part of the rolling computer network we use every day for personal transportation.

In the 21st century, hybrid, plug-in hybrid and electric vehicles are commonplace; hydrogen fuel cell and other alternative fuel vehicles are deployed in municipal fleets around the country, and internet connections, voice recognition commands and GPS mapping are available in economy to luxury models.

Given the advance of technology and a richly varied automotive industry that offers an array of positions and career paths, the future is bright for talented young people with math, science, communications and technical skills. And unlike many high-tech careers that require four, six or even eight years of college, automotive technology careers can begin after just two years of education.

As with any career, lifelong learning and continuing education is necessary, but the simple fact is that students in automotive technology can get out into the real world sooner – and with less college debt.

This is the first of a series of blogs wherein we’ll explore the wealth of choices and opportunities a career in the automotive service industry can offer. I think you’ll find it an enlightening journey. Next up: job prospects and career paths that may surprise you.

Source- https://asashop.org/blog/dont-overlook-automotive-technology-high-tech-career-path/

How to Remove a Gasoline Smell

If you own a car or home, it’s pretty likely that you’ve dealt closely with gasoline. Whether you’ve had a spill while fueling up your car at a station or while preparing to mow your lawn, you know how intoxicating the stench of gas can be. When soaked into fabrics such as car upholstery or clothing, the smell can be not only overpowering, but also dangerous.

When simple soap and water doesn’t remove the scent of gasoline, don’t give up and allow yourself to breathe in lingering fumes. Try these simple tricks to remove the odor completely. Each of these solutions is as effective as the others, however you will have to decide which will be best for you depending on the area of the odor as well as your preference in cleaning supplies and products.

What You’ll Need

Removing Smell from Your Body

If you were recently working with gasoline, you could have residual odor left on you. If the gas smell is on your body, no amount of conditioning a room will help if you’re still standing in it. Luckily you can remove the odor pretty easily so that your friends and family don’t suffer from your smell

First, mix a bit of vanilla with water and dip a rag in the mixture. Then rub or wash areas of your body where the gasoline has spilled. You could also use a mixture of water and vinegar or of water and lemon.

Once you have rubbed and washed it off with a rag you will want to take a shower. This will allow you to get the smell of lemon, vinegar or vanilla off of you.

WARNING: Keep in mind that unlike many DIY solutions you brew up, this one is being applied directly to your skin. When choosing ingredients for your solution, be mindful of things like allergies and skin sensitivities. Also consider any open wounds you may have, as lemon and vinegar can irritate and sting. Vanilla is probably the best mixture to use to avoid any irritation on cuts.

Removing Smell from Your Car

Gasoline spills in the car are unfortunately common, especially when you are transporting gas cans. A healthy spritz of Febreeze is a good first choice to cover up the smell, but it won’t remove the spill.

To remove as much gasoline as possible, try a mixture of baking soda, white vinegar, and hot water. Mix everything in a bowl and use a rag to gently wipe off the seats or rugs in the car that smell.

Removing Smell from Your Carpet

Finally, if the smell of gasoline is lingering in your carpet, you will want to be careful about what you use to clean it up. The best thing to do is to gather two mixing bowls, a few clean rags, hot water, baking soda, a wet/dry vacuum, and vinegar.

Use one rag to soak up any residual liquid in the area where the spill occurred. Then, in one bowl, mix a little hot water with vinegar, and in the other bowl, mix hot water with baking soda into a paste-like consistency.

Apply the vinegar and water solution to the area of the carpet that has the odor on it. Use the vacuum or a rag to soak and clean up the affected area. Then cover the area with the baking soda and water mixture. Use the vacuum or a rag again to wipe off and clean the spot. Then use hot water to clean the area and allow it to dry freely.

 

taken from – http://automotive.repair/2016/09/how-to-remove-a-gasoline-smell/ http://www.doityourself.com/stry/how-to-remove-a-gasoline-smell

Will NACE Make a Comeback?

Written by Gary Ledoux

For years, the National (then later the International) Autobody Congress and Exposition, better known simply as NACE—later combined with the Congress of Automotive Repair and Service, better known simply as CARS—had been the premier trade show for the collision industry.

Driven by its sponsoring organization, the Automotive Service Association(ASA), the NACE show saw terrific growth in its early years, then fell into a long decline.

There will be no NACE show for 2019. So what happened?

Founding and Growth

Sponsored by the then-premier automotive repair organizations of their time, the Independent Automotive Service Association and the Automotive Service Councils, the first NACE show was held in November 1983 at the Opryland Hotel in Nashville, TN. Prior to this time, there had been a number of small, regional shows sponsored by local auto body associations, but this was the first show of its kind on a national scale. The first show proved popular and exceeded expectations.

NACE came along at precisely the right time in the evolution of the industry. In the summer of 1983, a spot survey of shops conducted by the trade media asked how many had attended a national or local trade show. Close to 80 percent had recently been to a trade show, and over 90 percent had been to one in the past two years. Those who did attend said they wanted to look at the latest equipment and keep up on repair techniques and trends. Those who didn’t attend claimed there were no shows in their area, or they just didn’t have time to go—being so busy just to stay afloat. The first show saw 171 exhibitor booths and about 1,500 attendees.

Reaching Its Peak

In the early ‘80s, shops were on a buying frenzy securing new equipment to work on the new unibody cars. A trade show was the ideal place to see the equipment, talk with manufacturer reps and network with other shop owners.

Only two years later, in 1985, NACE attendees exceeded 4,000. In 1986, attendance exceeded 6,200, and by 1988, attendance broke 10,000. The last show of the decade saw more than 15,000 attendees.

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